Gangster music 2019


Here are our 10 favorite songs written in the time signatures of 7/4 and 7/8. Check out what makes them tick and hopefully they’ll give you some ideas!

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This gripping narrative follows a suicidal lady who is saved by a stranger, but quickly becomes obsessive and forces the man to abandon her in her confused and unsafe mental state. Frustrated and full of anguish, the lady runs back to the very same building to fulfill her earlier wish, before we see her intentionally drop her shoe in front of another man, revealing to the viewer her malicious deception to find herself a partner.

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With overwhelmingly positive results, we’re happy to share a few select testimonials of Soundfly’s Beginner Harmonic Theory course directly from our students.

Whether you’re drafting demos for your next album, producing a 30-second spot for a video or beats for an electronic project, or actually tracking an entire album with your band in your living room, combining the comfort of your domestic space with business-like workflow habits and studio quality gear can lead to great results — so long as you don’t fall through one of the many trap doors inherent to this way of working.

Ian is a pianist, entrepreneur and professional musician. He started Soundfly to help people really find what gets them most excited musically and pursue it. He’s toured all over the world with his experimental trio Sontag Shogun. Check out his most recent course Building Blocks of Piano or follow him on Twitter at @ianrtemple.

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The album is filled with so many glorious quotes and clichés (this is a high compliment). I never got tired of listening. With so many possibilities, how do you hone in on and develop your better ideas?

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Remember, you can break words up with a motif, like in “Somewhere Over the Rainbow.”  “Some-where” gets split in half by an octave because the songwriter wanted to really draw our attention to the idea of longing for this magical place, reaching up to the next octave like it’s up in the sky.

“High Hopes”: Oof! Starting with a three-and-a-half-bar intro here totally reframes how you hear the chorus at first. It’s mind-bending — yet another example of how that squishy pattern-recognition machine in our heads can be used against us by the savvy songwriter. Another tricky task here is what to call the second pre-chorus’s extension. It’s new material, so you could call it a bridge — but I mean, who ever heard of a bridge squishing itself in between our abutting pre-chorus and chorus sections? No matter what you call this section, it’s quite a rare bird in the form-iary.

The problem is that these tendencies are the exact opposite of what we should be doing if we want to see real improvement, according to Dr. Anders Ericsson. And we might be wise to listen. Dr. Ericsson is widely considered one of the foremost thinkers on the subject of “expertise.” His research is one of the primary sources that inspired Malcolm Gladwell’s now-famous “10,000 Hour Rule” — that it takes 10,000 hours of deliberate practice to be an expert in anything. But that rule, though memorable, is far from the whole story.

“God’s Plan”: Man, the chords in this loop were hard to identify. Not only because the notes here don’t conform to standard A-440 tuning (it’s all about 20 cents sharp of G major), but because they start out as ninth chords whose upper halves are louder and more timbre-distinct than their lower, arpeggio-happy halves. It’s almost like it’s better explained not as “9-chords,” but as “an Em stacked on top of an Am,” and then “a D chord stacked on a G chord.” This “separation” thinking is enhanced by the low-muffled organ patch playing the Am and G, and the more trebly organ patch playing the Em and D.

“I feel more musically confident because of this course. I really thought it was helpful dissecting a song and learning how it achieved a certain vibe.”