Financial assistance for artists


These ideas all might ring true in other area of life, but they don’t have to apply to your singing voice. Singing does not necessarily have to render you “open” and vulnerable to the listener. Try to disconnect from these notions. The best way to do so is to see your voice is an instrument, and your singing is a product of your creativity and skill. Your singing is not a reflection of your “soul” (so to speak).

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Focus: Finish this track, and begin to develop a live performance setup around it.

Top hip hop artists 2018

Solution: Keep a practice journal and set weekly goals. Budget your practice time in your journal the way you would your finances. Break goals into small chunks and keep a record of how you actually end up spending that time. Make adjustments regularly and cut yourself some slack. Ten minutes of focused practice can be more helpful than two hours of tedious drills, particularly if your mind is elsewhere. Instead of panicking over minutes and hours, focus on what you can achieve in the time you have available.

We are conditioned to think that great vocalists are just born that way — “gifted,” “blessed,” and we wonder if we were given those gifts too… Really? No. Shut up. Try to remember that this is not true. You need to put the work in if you want to be great. It starts with getting yourself a good vocal coach.

Interested in booking a tour through a new town? Learn more about the best venues, unmissable sights, and inspiring musical stops in towns all over the world, direct from the artists who call them home in our ongoing series The Compass: Musicians Introduce Us to Their Cities.

From a t-shirt and jeans with a stencil type design to full stage costumes, masks, and wigs with branded graphics, here’s why your band’s visuals matter.

Evan Zwisler is a NYC-based musician who is most notably known for his work with The Values as a songwriter and guitarist. He is an active member of the Brooklyn music scene, throwing fundraisers and organizing compilations for Planned Parenthood and the Anti-Violence Project. He started playing music in the underground punk scene of Shanghai with various local bands when he was in high school before going to California for college and finally moving to New York in 2012.

National endowment for the arts logo

So how does it work, exactly? Signing up and creating an artist page is pretty easy. Once you do that, you’ll start receiving a weekly report with insights into your audience engagement and which artist stage you’re at. These stages are broken down into Undiscovered, Promising, Established, Mainstream, and Epic — a really funky poster in the classic Coachella style is provided to help you understand what that means. Check it out.

Decades before he was laying down the bass track for Daft Punk’s “Get Lucky,” consummate studio session man Nathan East was playing on hit records left and right. A song that is a little bit hard rock, a little bit R&B, done by a band that until then was sort of new-wave-ish, “Would I Lie to You” seems like a fitting way to end this list.

But there’s a number of ways that Diggers Factory distances itself from the classical crowdfunding model. Unlike these platforms, we don’t let people decide on the amount of their contribution. They pay for the record at the price set by the artist to cover the production costs and everyone will get the same reward: the record. However, fans can decide to make a donation when [they] buy the record in order to give extra support to the artist.

You need to select your sample group of critics very carefully. Ask honest opinions of people who you believe to have a decent understanding of music and who are passionate about the genres you’re exploring. This way, you can avoid irrelevant opinions that won’t serve you.

With so much new music available at our fingertips and ears, it’s easy to forget about bands we used to love and listen to like they were their own form of religion. At ten years old, I was obsessed with neo-soul — The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill was one of the first CDs I purchased with my own money. Now, at 30 years old, I get 300 artists thrown at me every day in the form of playlists, social media, paid advertising, etc.

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